Blog Post

Recap: Influencer Marketing Panel with SE2

Thirty nonprofits join SE2 for crash course on the hottest trend in communications: influencer marketing
October 22, 2016
Earlier this month, clients and colleagues joined us for a panel discussion on influencer marketing – a new form of paid media that uses popular and trusted social media personalities to drive brands’ messages to a larger market.
It basically works like this: The brand hires influencers. The brand briefs the influencers on the issue and provides parameters for their engagement. The influencers create original, branded content and share that content across online platforms. Lots of people engage!
Our panelists included Jess Harvat, tobacco communications specialist from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment; Sarah Kurz, vice president of policy and communications for LiveWell Colorado; Natalie P., a Denver-based influencer and author of the blog ByNatalie.co; and, Taylor Lobato, an associate here at SE2.
It was an insightful and interactive hour filled with great conversation about how organizations are integrating influencer marketing into their communications campaigns.
Our panel shared tips and lessons learned that organizations should consider as they’re planning their first influencer marketing campaigns.
Their tips for organizations looking to get started with influencer marketing included:
  • Don’t let geographic boundaries limit your thinking. Influencers don’t have to live in your community or region to reach your audience. Because they are experts on a topic or in a niche, many influencers attract an audience that lives somewhere else. They may live in California but have a strong following in your state. Influencer search tools can help you identify influencers who have a strong following in your community.
  • Get to know the influencers. Relationships play a critical role in influencer marketing. Building a relationship with your influencers, and providing them with one-on-one support, will result in better, more compelling content.
  • Make it personal. Just as you would personalize pitches to reporters, you should also personalize the pitch to influencers. Find creative ways to connect your issue or cause to things that the influencer cares about. Get creative with it.
  • Don’t neglect the brief. We provide influencers with a brief when we engage them for a campaign. The brief provides a short summary of the organization and the goals and key messages we want influencers to use in their posts. Additionally, we provide influencers with brand assets that they can manipulate and make their own. By clearly defining those guardrails for the influencers, we find that they produce better (and more on message) content that requires fewer revisions.
  • Invest in a tool. Influencer marketing can be done in small scale without a tool, but trying to create and manage a campaign that includes more than a few influencers is extremely challenging without the support of an influencer marketing tool. (SE2 has a tool that we license to other organizations. Contact us for more details – Brandon@PublicPersuasion.com.)
You can find other tips shared by our panelists by searching “#SE2Influence” on Twitter. Check out our presentation on influencer marketing below.

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Influencer Marketing for Nonprofit Organizations

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